your sadness is my sadness, your joy is my joy

Day 204

photo by Wilson Alvarez

photo by Wilson Alvarez

Who am I to speak of grief

when there are those who’ve

had to place the soft bodies of small children in

the cold, bare ground?

Who am I to talk of sadness when

there are those whose

homes, bodies, lives have been torn apart by war?

Whole families, and neighborhoods,

communities

bombed, murdered and burned.

Who am I to speak of mourning

when there are those who’ve lived as the last of their kind?

Hollow and aching,

lonesome for

a world that no longer exists,

Ishi, Martha, the buffalo,

the rhinos.

Who am I to grieve for what we’ve lost,

and what we’re losing,

for the suffering

wrapped around us like a dark, black cocoon?

Many carry grief much heavier than mine.

But then, isn’t grief something

we were meant to share?

A connection between open hearts allowing us

to carry the weight together?

I was afraid that letting the sadness in would

force me to fence off my heart,

seal it behind walls made of mortar and brick just to make it through the day.

But the opposite is true.

Each time we allow ourselves to feel the sadness

of the sweet souls around us

it makes us softer,

filled with empathy and caring

so the edges blur until we can no longer tell where we stop

and the others begin.

And that deep connection

brings the clearest joy

like the crystal notes of the

thrush, brushing the blue sky

in the highest tree.

Let us not shy away from each others’ sorrows.

Instead,

let us carry them gently

in softly cupped hands

and hold them

in the strong arms of tight hugs

and warm embraces.

Your sadness is my sadness.

Your joy is my joy.

Please share with me

so that we might

walk this road

together.

Thank you for listening,

Love,

Natasha

1798484_10201639942381264_474597644_n

Advertisements

4 responses to “your sadness is my sadness, your joy is my joy

  1. krisstanamus

    Zoey smiles…

  2. This is so beautifully sad and brutally true. Only when we can share our grief and sorrows with others and when others can “…carry them gently in softly cupped hands…” can we begin to heal. Thank you for this.

  3. This is beautifully sad and brutally true. We must be able to share our grief and sorrows and have others “…carry them gently in softly cupped hands…” Only in doing so will we be able to begin the process of healing.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s